Category Archives: Travel

The Great EU Quest: Estonia – Happy Museum Day

Last full day in Estonia – just how I got to this position so quickly is beyond me, but that’s always the way when you are on holiday.

I think the best way to off this post would to wish you all a belated Happy International Museum Day. Yes, that is a thing and this year it was on May 18th. In Tallinn this meant that every museum we came across waived the entrance fee for a day. Just to be upfront about this, all the savings that we made today (which amounted to over 40€) happened by sheer fluke. I had no idea about any of this and really cannot believe my luck about any of this.

The day started out with us making the 3km walk from our hotel near the Old Town to Kadriorg Park. Our first destination of the day was the park’s namesake (Kadriorg Palace) but that doesn’t mean that we didn’t take out chance to look around before getting to the first museum of the day.

So this was the point where we learned about this day being International Museum Day and that museums across Tallinn were doing free entry for the day. We still had to visit the ticket office to get a sticker and check our bags, but apart from that we could pretty much stroll in.

As someone who has been feeling in a bit of a Russian history mood after finishing Anna Karenina I looked forward to the chance to stroll around this palace. It was built by Tsar Peter the Great for his wife Catherine (which explains the name) as a small Baroque style palace that would be used as a summer retreat.

As a building this has changed hands a few times (as has country of Estonia) and is now part of the The Art Museum of Estonia where it houses their foreign art collection. The fact that this was an art museum was of lesser concern to us since we were mainly there to have a nose around an imperial summer palace.


If you are to come to this palace there is one room in particular that will grab you and is referred to as the Baltic Pearl of the North. It functioned as a stateroom and, according to the information plaque, is the only room of this type in a Northern Europe to have been preserved as it was back then.

It’s a beautiful room. If it wasn’t for Helsinki’s Rock Church this would be the most impressive single room that I’d seen. Just the ornateness and the extreme whiteness of  the fixtures keep you looking around and finding new things to focus on. For me, it was interesting to note that this was actually quite a small room for its function when you consider the larger residential palaces of royal families. I guess that’s down to this being a ‘summer home’.

Seeing how it was an Estonian May, the garden wasn’t exactly ready for tourist season. It’s a shame as I can imagine it being rather beautiful once everything is in bloom. Hey ho, at least these flowerbeds see the light of day, unlike the statues that this palace has in a storage room next to the toilets. That was weird.


Continuing the theme of Peter the Great: the next stop was a few buildings down the road. It’s the cottage of Peter the Great which he stayed in as the palace was being completed. The idea that a Tsar would stay I’m a small building like this rather than just retiring to one of his other palaces is a bit of an odd thought. I guess it just speaks for the pull of Tallinn.

The museum itself is rather small since the cottage itself was rather small. It made for a more intimate insight into how one of the richest men in the world lived back then. Seeing all these things has really made me realise that I really should try to learn more about European history. After all, knowing about the past can help you know the future.

Before I get too philosophical lets move onto the next museum: the Kumu Museum. Essentially this is the main art museum in Tallinn with a collection split across 3 floors. The main focus of the art in this museum is Art by Estonian artists, but there are pieces by others in here too… even if I hadn’t heard of any of these.


If you start from the top and work down you are pretty much going back in time; something that I would really recommend. The more modern section was focused on art by women and was curated around an Estonian artist of recent years Anu Põder. The work varied from bizarre images of blow-up dolls with parts of their bodies being crushed to a rather sad installation centred around a Polish artist and her cancer diagnosis.


The art of the remaining two floors really helped to fill in a number of gaps surrounding Estonian history and the psyche of the people. For the first thing I didn’t realise just how important music is to this country, I know that they hold a song festival and that this is a major event in the Estonian calendar, but having this out into the context of the rise of Estonian national identity in the early 1900s really helped to cement the importance. I know that Finland went through similar with Sibelius’s work ‘Finlandia’ being an example this.

Also, it was interesting to see a lot of the art that was being created during the Soviet occupation. I mean, it hasn’t even occurred to me that there would be hippies in the Soviet Union during the 1960s, I figured that the cultural wall was so airtight that things like the counter-culture of the USA would have struggled to make it through.

Another thing that this forced me to appreciate is just how hard the job of curating a gallery of Estonian art must be. As a language and as a culture the Estonian people have been around for ages, but as a nation it has only been 100 years. To try and work out if an artist is Estonian or an occupying population (German, Swedish, Russian etc) must be onerous at times. So, full credit where it is due there.


3 km and a sea buckthorn juice later from one of the many shopping centres in Tallinn, we were back in the Old Town for the final museum of the day at St Nicholas Church. This is another example of a building in Tallinn that has been repurposed into an art museum, but at least the work in the church stays on message.

Whilst the interior of the church itself is very beautiful, the thing that has stayed with me  the most as I write at gone midnight (I really need to start these earlier, I blame the latest Trump scandal on CNN) was the depiction of the Danse Macabre. Essentially, this is a long painting depicting members high up in the social hierarchy (e.g. The Pope, an emperor and a king) being led by dancing skeletons. Essentially this a symbol of the plague and about how no one can escape death, no matter their status. I had to take my time to appreciate this one because it was so large and quite unusual. Regrettably the sister piece to this artwork was housed in a church in Lübeck, Germany that was bombed in World War Two.


The rest of the church/museum exhibited pieces from the church and, in what I believe is a temporary exhibition, silver work from one of the old guilds in Tallinn (or Reval as it was known back then).


After some final pieces of souvenir shopping it was time for an early dinner where we returned to Olde Hansa. It made for a nice way to bookmark the trip and allowed us to see inside this surprisingly good touristy medieval themed restaurant.


As a main course I went for the game sausages which is meant to be made from a mixture of wild boar, elk and (you guessed it) bear. I have no idea how much, if any, bear meat there was in these sausages, but they were absolutely gorgeous. As was the sauerkraut and turnips that it was served with. I know that my mum recoiled at the idea of eating bear meat, but I feel that if you are in a country with properly regulated hunting (as is the case with Estonia) then give it a go; else, maybe not.


For dessert it was a rose pudding with edible rose petals that was out of this world. Usually the tourist themed restaurants have something that lets them down such as the quality of food or service, but Olde Hansa really did knock it out of the park both times.

So yes, after a final walk around the Old Town it was packing in the hotel room and getting ready for the…oh wait there’s something else.

List Item: Try three quarters of the 1001 Foods You Must Try Before You Die
Food item: Boysenberry
Progress: 650/751

We bought a jar of boysenberry jam when we were in Helsinki and it only occurred to me as we were packing that I wouldn’t be able to bring this back because of the rules around liquids in carry on bags. I guess this is a downside of not paying to check in a bag. But hey midnight jam is midnight jam and I’ve reached another food list landmark!

Botanically boysenberry is a hybrid of a number of berries including European raspberry and blackberry. You get that from the taste. Usually I am not that much of a jam fan as I find the traditional strawberry and raspberry jams too sweet and blackcurrant jams as a bit too tart. This Finnish boysenberry jam is right on that sweet-spot between sweet and tart, therefore it is gorgeous and there is no way that I will be able to buy this in the UK.

So I’m needing to wind this down because it’s a travel day tomorrow. I’ve really enjoyed my time here in Estonia (and the day trip to Finland). It makes me sad that it is over and it is back to the daily grind. Seeing as how I have now seen Estonia and Lithuania one of the next countries on my list needs to be Latvia so I can complete the set. Maybe the same time next year as I have enjoyed being in Tallinn just before the tourist season hits.

So until then, goodbye Baltics. I’ll miss you.

Advertisements

The Great EU Quest: Estonia – Lahemaa Park

There’s no better way to start the day than coming across a food list item when you are going for breakfast. Especially when it can form part of a hotel buffet breakfast that will need to fuel a nice long bog walk.

List Item: Try three quarters of the 1001 Foods You Must Try Before You Die
Food item: Tallinn Kilud
Progress: 649/751

When I was doing my pre-planning for this trip to Estonia, Tallinn Kilud was the only ‘must find’ food item because of the extreme regional availability. So, colour me pleased when I saw this bowl of the little guys.

Having had rollmops before I kind of knew what to expect with these little fish. In essence these are sprats from the Baltic Sea that have been deboned and and marinated/pickled to the point that these become melt in the mouth.

At this point, where I have tried a number of picked fish like these, I am not sure what makes these little fish distinctive enough to warrant their place on the list. Maybe it’s down to the size, the region or because you can find tins of Tallinn Kilud in many shops as a food souvenir. Still, these with dark rye bread and soured cream made for a nice change of pace for breakfast.

So, the order of the day was a guided tour through the Lahemaa National Park by the company EstAdventures. I’m not one for paying for a guided tour, but since there was no other way for us to get to the park an exception was made. Just going to say this now in advance: I am glad we did as the tour was excellent and the guide was funny and super knowledgeable. If I find myself back in Tallinn I will look them up again.


The first stop was at the Rebala Bronze Age Graves. These were uncovered by the Soviets as they were building a road from Tallinn to St Petersburg – and since these graves were in the way each one was moved a few metre away piece by piece. To look at them now you would have no idea, but it’s an interesting fact.

What was also interesting to see is how the family dog received their own little section, right next to the circle of the master of the family. It goes to show how some things never really change in thousands of years.


From here we hopped into the car and went to Kiiu Tower – which I have seen as being described as Estonia’s smallest castle. Nope, it’s literally just a tower that the local rich family (of German origin as all these rich families seemed to be) used to help to defend their home from the Estonian peasants. We were able to go inside to the top floor (up yet more steep stairs) to find that it now contained a bed and some drawings to make it feel like Rapunzel’s bedroom in Tangled. It was very cute.


Now, for the event I was looking forward to – the Viru Bog Trail. A very large amount of Estonia is formed from mire and bogland, and at the Lahemaa park you are able to walk through it via a specially constructed boardwalk. It’s nothing as glamorous as the name would sound. We are talking about s continuous trail made of perpendicular pairs of planks. For the most part they are absolutely perfect, but despite the fact that these were fairly new a few had already started to break because of the wetness of the bog and the weight of people walking over them.

Truly, walking through this bog was the highlight of the day. Sure the ability to drive through a seemingly endless sea of dead straight trees was one thing, but these bogs really was something else.

At the beginning it was interesting because of how so much plantlife survives in such an acidic and hostile environment. Then you get to the parts of the big where ponds and lakes can develop because the ground is so saturated. It’s like the Dead Marshes from Lord of the Rings in the way that it is so eerily beautiful and int hat you can imagine long dead people just laying there in the big just waiting to be uncovered.


We turned around at an observation tower that allowed for some spectacular aerial views of the bog land and give an indicator of just far we had been walking. I think I must have taken a ludicrous number of panorama photographs on my iPhone and still I don’t think I have grabbed as much as I could have. It was standing up here that also made me thankful that it wasn’t a sunny day. With it being slightly overcast none of us were getting too warm during the track and, at least for me, that made the whole walk all the better.

After lunch we went to the Palmse Manor Estate for a tour around one of the 4 manors within the park. Apparently the owners of this manor was so powerful that he actually was a key fight in the assassination of a Russian Tzar and got off nearly punishment free. It must be awesome to be so powerful.

As part of this section we took a look around the house, the grounds and the orangery where I learned that people would rent watermelons so they could be displayed as status symbols… I mean in the world we live in right now this is a weird idea. To rent fruit to show off to people. I guess watermelons were the fancy watches of their day?

The house itself was nice enough, but all memories of it have faded compared to the sound of this ridiculous wind up musical cabinet that could be found in the music room. It made such a clamour that it could be heard throughout the manor. I loved it.

Between the manor and the final stop we made visits to small coastal villages at Altja and Käsmu. The sea was so calm in these bays that, at the latter place, you could see swans bobbing up and down in the middle of the sea. To be fair to our guide, he gave us so much information about these areas it is just that A lot of it is slipping my mind at midnight on the same day.


It was nice to spend some time by the sea and not seeing your stereotypical sandy beach. The scatterings of rocks, the abundance of grasses and the rather ramshackle fishing shacks just added to the character of the whole place .


Our final stop before heading back to Tallinn was the Jägala Waterfall – Estonia’s tallest waterfall at a mighty 8 metres high. To be fair, Estonia is a flat country so it would make sense that the waterfall wouldn’t be too tall.

The extraordinary thing about these waterfalls is the yellow colour of the water coming over the falls. It looks like industrial runoff, but the colour is actually because the water is coming from the bogs that we visited earlier in the day. Also of note is that this waterfall is retreating fairly quickly for a waterfall, which can be seen by the big piles of rocks at the bottom of the falls.

So yes that’s the tour and after two full excursion days I was definitely in the mood for food. Thanks to TripAdvisor I found a nice little place near Toompea that served, what felt like, Estonian food. You can tell it’s a good food because it was filled with Estonian people, who were surprisingly quiet. I swear that if you got a group of 12 Brits around a table having dinner together there would bite a lot of noise, but not Estonians. I think I am really growing to like these people.


Since I missed the chance to do so in Helsinki – I knew that I had to try some elk stew. Honestly this elk meat tasted a lot like a mix of beef and ostrich rather than venison that I have had before. It was lovely with the sauce (that contained beer) and the vegetables. It just furthers shows to me that it’s important to try local things even if they sound a bit outlandish when compared to what you are used to at home.


For dessert I finally got a chance to sample kama. From the sound of it this is a very Estonian food that can be had for breakfast or as a dessert. It’s made when different grains are ground up until they are very fine and are mixed with soured cream and some sweetener. It sounds a bit weird, but it was a nice mild way to round off a meal. So I would recommend at least trying it when making the journey to Estonia.

So tomorrow is the last full day. I know I say this every time but I can’t believe that the end is coming so soon. Still. One more day to see more of Tallinn and soak up as much of Estonia as possible.

The Great EU Quest: Finland – Helsinki!!!

The phrase “when in Tallinn” comes to mind:

List Item: Visit all EU countries
Progress: 17/28


Country: Finland
Year first visited: 2017

I mean, when you are able to get to another nation’s capital in under two hours it is rude to not pay a visit. So that’s what we did and we temporarily bid farewell to Tallinn and said hello to Helsinki.


We booked ourselves on the first and last boats of the day so we could make the best use of our time as possible. This, however, meant leaving the hotel just before 7 to walk across town to the pier. Whilst we were tired this did allow us to experience Tallinn Old Town in a different way: almost completely deserted. It made it feel like we were on an old film set, so it was both cool and a little bit eerie.

Now, whilst there are many different ways to get across the water to Helsinki we went for the Linda Line. It’s the fastest at about 1h 45m whilst also having the best times in order to have a full day excursion. It’s a bit no frills, but as someone who finds it easy to fall asleep in most moving vehicles I didn’t notice much about the boat before we docked in Helsinki.

To say I was ridiculously excited to be setting food in Finland would be an understatement. This is one of those countries that I’ve always wanted to pay a visit to and, like with Estonia, it’s because of the Finnish flag. What can I say, I’m a sucker for a flag with blue and white with no red.

Thanks to an excessive amount of Googling I managed to piece together a decent itinerary for a day in Helsinki – well it worked for me and has made me want more time in this city at some point in the future.


So from the boat we went through Market Square to the golden topped Upensky Church. In retrospect, I regret not having bought breakfast from one of the stalls in the square. I mean how often do you come across this many chances to eat reindeer for breakfast. Maybe next time eh?


Anyway, this church is the first time I have stepped into an Eastern Orthodox church that isn’t the Russian sect. The roof of the dome still had the starry sky quality and there was still a lot of gold on display, but there was still a different feel to it. For one thing the workers in the church felt a lot more accommodating and relaxed around tourists. Also, the moratorium on taking pictures wasn’t there, which is good for the sake of memories.


After this we made our way to the Helsinki Cathedral. This glistening white building truly dominates the skyline in this part of the city, which reminded me of the castle in Himeji. We clearly had the perfect weather to see this particular building. Just the contrast of the bright white with the pure blue sky made for some great picture taking.


The inside of this Lutheran cathedral was a massive contrast with the Orthodox church. A plain white interior with a few statues to key figures and a lot of smooth lines made this church feel beautiful in its own way despite being sparsely decorated.


By now we were getting hungry and, thanks for the need for brunch, we got a cruel awakening at how different the prices are between Finland and Estonia. These two sandwiches and the drinks cost us just over 20€. They were great sandwiches (one was avocado, tomato and cashew nut) but this was a lot of money.

On our way to see the key landmark of the day we came across the Parliament building, which was being restored, and an army marching band that were practising in a space nearby. It was fun to watch and there was a lot more moving and chanting than I would have first expected. It was also rather cute when the band leader saluted the crowd whenever we applauded.

 List item: Visit 100 of the Lonely Planet’s Ultimate Travelist
Progress: 71/100Sight: Temppeliaukio Kirkko
Location: Helsinki, Finland
Position: #311

If you come to this church from the wrong angle you would be excused for wondering where the church actually is. The Rock Church (which is a much easier name to say than the Finnish one) has been carved right into the natural rock formations that pepper Helsinki. You can actually climb on top of the church since there is a path that helps you clamber up the rocks.

The inside of the church is something truly special. I have seen anything quite like it and if it was not for me seeing the Sagrada Familia two months ago to would be the best church that I had visited in years.

It’s really hard to get a good photograph of the Rock Church that shows off what makes it so special. For one thing the natural rock walls make this an acoustically special church. Plus all the natural light that is allowed to come in just helps to make this a very relaxing space. This really is a special place.

Time was marching on, so after a bit of light souvenir shopping we made our way back to Market Square to catch a waterbus to the Suomenlinna Sea Fortess. This means a 15-20 minute boat ride where you get a chance to see the Helsinki Islands whizz by. I cannot recommend doing this journey enough. It was a real eye opener to the number of islands around the city and their different sizes.


The Soumenlinna Fortress itself was extremely interesting to walk around and is something I would have thought of doing if it wasn’t for different people on the web. The idea that this fortress, in the space of 2-300 years has been used to defend Sweden, Finland and Russia (due to the many times Finland has changed hands over the years) makes this an interesting structure.

Add to that the different sorts of buildings including gardens, courtyards, barracks of differing building styles and a church then that’s a snapshot of what is at Soumenlinna. In warmer temperatures this would make for a great picnicking spot – for us we made use of one of the many cafes where hot chocolate and chocolate-almond torte helped replenish some energy supplies.

After a few hours on the fortress and a bit of wandering around Helsinki’s Design District it was time to be back on the ferry and head off to Tallinn. By the time we got back to the hotel it was 9 so we nipped out for a quick dinner at the nearby shopping centre.

List Item: Try three quarters of the 1001 Foods You Must Try Before You Die
Food item: Wild Raspberry
Progress: 648/751

So it appears that I could have crossed this off ages ago. When it said wild raspberry it pretty much covers most of what we in Europe would call raspberries. Therefore I decided that I would look for some sort of raspberry treat in order to cross this off. A chocolate raspberry cake seemed exactly right for this challenge. Lord knows I needed it after such a long day.

There you go. A day in Helsinki and I am still typing this up despite the fact it is gone midnight. Tomorrow will be another early start as we join a tour to Lahemaa Park and other surrounding areas. It’ll be good to get a chance to see more of Estonia.

The Great EU Quest: Estonia – The Old Town

Oh man after minimal sleep there was a well deserved lie in today. Aside from a rather weird pillow that kept re-inflating itself as you got comfortable this bed at the Palace Hotell in Tallinn is one of the most comfortable I’ve ever slept in.

 List item: Visit 100 of the Lonely Planet’s Ultimate Travelist
Progress: 70/100Sight: Tallinn Old Town
Location: Tallinn, Estonia
Position: #112

So today is the day that we properly covered the Old Town. There are still places like St Nicolas Church, the KGB museum and Kiek in de Kök to check out but that’s what the final full day is for.

One thing that continues to completely astound me about the Tallinn Old Town is just how well preserved it is. A huge proportion of the city wall is still intact in some shape or form and there are gates and towers that still survive to this day. Similarly, it would appear that the Tallinn Town Hall is 600-700 years old and is the oldest hall of its type in Northern Europe. Just, wow.


As a nice link with my trip to Vilnius, we first sought out the plaque symbolising the northernmost point of the ‘Baltic Way’ – a protest in 1989 where over 1 million citizens of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania formed a human chain through their capitals. As of now I have now stood at both ends of the chain. I guess I’ll need to find out if there is a similar commemoration in Riga when I end up visiting.

After this we were originally headed for the walkable section of the city walls… but being the eager beavers that we are we got there s bit before they opened. So we instead headed for Toompea (a small hill within the old town that overlooks everything). It is here that you can find the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral and Toompea Castle.


I say Toompea Castle, but this is not a castle as we had expected. Instead, what we have today is the very pink Estonian parliamentary building that has been build into some of the surviving castle walls and towers. The tallest tower has the beautiful Estonian flag hanging from the top. Yes, I am still enamoured with this flag and I have already bought a number of souvenirs containing the flag.

So from here we mooched around Toompea for a while. Getting lost in the winding streets and pastel buildings whilst entering way too many souvenir shops. Some embassies are up on Toompea including those of Ireland, Canada and the Netherlands. honestly, I cannot fault any nation that managed to snag a spot on Toompea, this is where you can get some beautiful views.


Such as this one. From up here you can really appreciate just how close the sea is, which goes a long way towards explaining all the cruise ship holidaymakers you see roaming the streets of Tallinn in large groups.

By the time we were done with Toompea a drink was in order for whatever reason we decided to go to the cafe built into the walls around the Danish King’s Garden. Oh my god the steepness and winding of the the stairs. It’s shameful to admit just how much my knees ached after climbing up these and I very much deserved a slice of apple pie.

We eventually made our way back to the walkable walls and took a walk along them. It isn’t a long walk despite the length of walls that are still around, but I guess not enough of them are connected or stable enough to allow a longer walkway. The people of York really should count themselves lucky there.


From this vantage point of the walls it is clear that the Estonians are very proud of their city and all the buildings within it. Honestly I can’t blame them. I have yet to go too far into their more recent history, but if it’s anything like what the people of Lithuania went through then they deserve every inch of national pride.

We dipped into a beautifully decorated Russian Orthodox church (that sadly didn’t allow any pictures, but trust me it was beautiful with its starry ceiling and gilded iconography) before venturing outside the city walls. You see, tomorrow we booked a trip on a ferry across the Gulf of Finland to visit Helsinki – so we did a hint of reconnaissance to try and find the port.


I knew that Tallinn is close to the sea, but I had never realised just how close. It’s not a beach city like many others, but there’s something about being close to the sea that just adds to a city.

List Item: Try three quarters of the 1001 Foods You Must Try Before You Die
Food item: Zander
Progress: 647/751

Dinner time! With the sun setting around 10pm it does feel weird to be having dinner in complete daylight.

Thanks to a happy coincidence after walking through St Catherine’s Passage I managed to find a restaurant that served zander! For the uninitiated this is a fish that is related to perch and is also known by the name pike-perch.

Honestly, I was expecting something a bit plainer for some reason. They way that the good people of Munga Kelda prepared this (pan fried with salt, pepper and dill before adding a bit of cheese on top) was absolutely gorgeous.

I guess I would say that The taste of the fish is the fish version of gamy. You can also tell from the taste how this is a predator fish like pike and black scabbardfish. Still, it’s a white fleshed fish with larger flakes than the scabbardfish.

So yes, that the first full day done. Early start tomorrow to catch an 8am ferry over to Helsinki. I’m really excited about visiting Finland… hopefully I don’t spend too much on weird souvenirs and squeaky cheese.

The Great EU Quest: Estonia – Arrival

That’s right. It is two months after my trip to Barcelona and I am on my travels yet again. Another completely new country for me which means…

List Item: Visit all EU countries
Progress: 16/28

Now this is one of those countries that I would have expected to have visited before Lithuania. I have always had a soft spot for Estonia for a particularly stupid reason – their flag. It’s weird I know, but I have always found Estonia to have the best looking national flag in Europe, which means that I will likely end up spending too much on souvenirs that make use of it.

Country: Estonia
Year first visited: 2017

Unlike a lot of other holidays this day of arrival was a true first day since the only flight between London and Tallinn required us to be at the airport by 5am. Honestly, I am shocked that I am at the end of the day and have yet to really feel the need to fall asleep.

Aside from crossing off another EU nation there is another reason for this visit Estonia: Tallinn’s Old Town. Therefore we went for a hotel that would allow us to make the best of it and I am able to take a picture like this:

So after a bit of light complaining about how tired and hungry we were it was time to venture forth into the Old Town itself. Since we are doing a proper explore of the Old Town tomorrow I won’t be crossing this off until then, still we were able to get a good feel for it.

The first thing that really grabbed me was just how well preserved so many of these old buildings are. You read, on conveniently located plaques, about how certain places date from several centuries ago and yet they look in better condition than most UK buildings from the 1960s.

Lunch was in a place called Olde Hansa – a restaurant I’ve seen mentioned in a bunch of guides about Tallinn. Why? Because the servers dress up in medieval garb and the foot is meant to somewhat resemble food of the time. This is a place that even serves bear meat! Tempting, but not 50€ tempting.

The food was hearty and reminded me a lot of food that I had in Bled a few years ago. I am under no illusion that most medieval serfs could have only dreamed of a plate like this, but it was fun to pretend.

After this it was a general explore of the area. We came across a large market selling flowers, giant tombstones, a huge variety of local handicrafts and many prospective places for future coffees and food. Like I said, there will be more of a proper explore tomorrow, but it was such a beautiful day that it would be a shame to let sleep deprivation get in the way.

One big thing we did see/do was the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral. Its of the buildings that I can see from the hotel room and the onion domes are a really imposing presence at the top of the Toompea Hill. Whilst this is not the largest Russian Orthodox church I have seen, it is the one that has made the biggest impact.

Inside, this is far from the bare or nearly bare Orthodox churches that I saw in Vilnius. Aside from the abundance of iconography and the enforced near silence, this church really had more of a Catholic feel to it.

Fast forwarding quite a bit now to dinner. Since we wanted to catch up on sleep we grabbed some bread, cheese and ham from a nearby supermarket to have for dinner. Luckily for me I was able to find a list cheese.

List Item: Try three quarters of the 1001 Foods You Must Try Before You DieFood item: Leipajuusto
Progress: 646/751

In Finnish the name basically means ‘bread cheese’, but in English speaking countries it’s called ‘Finnish squeaky cheese’. In Estonia, it would appear that they call it ‘Lapland Cheese’. Anyway, no matter what you call it this was an interesting cheese.

My god it doesn’t half squeak with every bite that you take. I knew that it would squeak, but not on every bite. It should be weird, but I think this might have been the most fun I have had with food since shabu shabu.

Tastewise it’s a bit like a creamy cottage cheese or a springy hard mozzarella. It has the texture of halloumi, but is unsalted so I can see how you might want to use it as a substitute for the Greek salad cheeses.

On its own the taste is milk, but it is lifted by the presence of other flavours like bacon and onion – I know this because some of the cheese had bacon pieces in it. Much like the smokey blue cheese, I am already sad that I won’t be able to get this in the UK as this would be perfect to have every now and then.

So there you go, the end of day one and as I finish writing this I can feel the lack of sleep catching up to me. Tomorrow will be a full day exploring the old town – who knows what we’ll find.

The Great EU Quest: Spain – Figueres

For our final day in Spain we ventured out of the city of Barcelona towards the town of Figueres some 70+ miles away. We booked tickets on the highspeed train so the journey only took 55 minutes each way (regular trains take 2.5 hours, so this was a no brainer).

Breakfast was a feast after we confused the server at the train station’s sandwich kiosk… being the English person I am I felt that I would rather pay the extra 4€ than make a fuss at there being an extra sandwich. The sandwich I asked for (which was Spanish omelette) was perfect for breakfast and has inspired me to make my own when I am back in the UK.

So, why did we go to Figueres in the first place? Well…

 List item: Visit 100 of the Lonely Planet’s Ultimate Travelist
Progress: 69/100Sight: Teatre-Museu Dalí
Location: Figueres, Spain
Position: #361

 

It’s the home of the Dalí Theatre and Museum. The final Lonely Planet check of this trip and something of genuine interest. I remember back when there was the Dalí Experience in London and have since enjoyed seeing anything of his that I come across. Even his sketches and lesser known pieces are inherently interesting because of the surreal nature of things.

So it’s little wonder that this museum was incredibly interesting. The only issue was the abundance of tour groups. Mostly school groups. It just meant that, at times, it was hard to navigate around the narrow corridors of the museum or get a good view of all the artworks.

Still, that didn’t overly detract from the unique experience that having so much Dalí in one place affords. I mean where else can you have an entire room with furniture set up to show the face of Mae West if you see it from the right angle?

How about corridors filled with paintings of rocks that look like naked women, gilded money skeletons and busts crowned with bread? It’s a truly unique experience that I would recommend – just make sure to seek out Galatea of the Spheres. It’s a great painting that few people were paying attention to… which is a shame.

So, what do you do after all that? Well, we decided to go on a bit of trek to the Sant Ferran Castle. The museum of antique typewriters wasn’t quite tempting enough.

For a reasonable price (and some collateral) you can get access to the castle with its free audio guide. The audio guide is a brick where you need to press play and pause (because it is one continuous track) and actually speaks to you out loud rather than through earphones. Honestly, it all felt rather comical as images of groups of tourists with different guides all playing at the same time immediately sprang to mind. What an awful cacophony that must be.

I say must be because we were the only tourists there at the time. Other than people who actually worked at the castle we were on our own. This castle is massive and is, at least according to the guide, the biggest fortress of its kind in Europe.

Vast and empty. So it felt like we were playing a sandbox version of Uncharted with the audio guide acting as director’s commentary. We clambered up the parapets, observed the plains from high vantage points – which reminds me:

List item: Visit a Spanish plain to see if it rains there
Status: Completed

 

I think what we had was a pretty unique experience that others who come to the fortress in the summer time wouldn’t have. I mean, this is a site that was only in the triple figures for Facebook check-ins. I would find it hard to recommend this enough should you fine yourself in the Figueres area. The free audio guide alone (the interesting information, not the comical size) would be enough. The ability to explore in isolation is a bonus.

We still had a few hours left until our return train to Barcelona, so we figured it was time for lunch. It’s the first time I have ever had someone make fideua for me… And I have to say that I prefer the one I make more. Not just because of the fiddly shelling of prawns, but because I put chorizo in mine. It may not be as authentic as the one we had… but sometimes authenticity needs to give way if something tastes better.

Our final moments in Figueres were spent in the jewels section of the Dalí museum. Originally we were going to give this a miss because it didn’t sound as interesting, but boy were we wrong. I never realised just how much he did in the way of jewellery design.

So many of the pieces were exceptional. Some of them were able to move, including a beating heart of rubies within a golden casing. My favourites are the two pictured above: an elephant with a giant crystal on its back and a lapis eye that can be used to tell time. Truly this man was an amazing talent. I always felt this, but now I definitely know it.

An hour or so later and we were back in Barcelona. We took the metro to the Arc de Triomphe area of the city, just because it can be nice too see what remnants are left over from World Fairs. I mean, sure, this is no Eiffel Tower but this promenade has its own calming charms.

From here we, finally, managed to gain admittance to the Santa Maria del Mar. We tried a few days earlier, but it was during the 2-3 hour where you needed to pay and we didn’t see the point. So glad that we were able to get in for free as it was mighty impressive on the inside.

It was never going to beat the Sagrada Familia, but looking at the columns and ceiling work it feels like Gaudí might have got at least some inspiration from here. Even if it was the number and thinness of the columns used to support the structure. On the who it felt very pure and uncluttered… something I know Gaudí would have appreciated.

So here I am now. We polished off a dinner of paella and chocolate covered churros and now it it time to pack for the flight tomorrow afternoon. Thanks to EU customs I have 6 food list items that will be coming home with me and will likely become their own blog post incredibly soon.

I wish that we didn’t have to leave here so soon, but that’s the issue with not spending a full week somewhere. Somehow I doubt it will take another 27 years before I am back in Spain. Already the precursors of itineraries are springing up in my head – so maybe I’ll be visiting Grenada, Madrid or Seville at some point in the near future. I hope so.

The Great EU Quest: Spain – Sagrada Familia Day

For me it feels like the sites of today share the similar theme of different forms of worship. It’s a bit of a tenuous link, but one I think can apply to the first three things saw today.

 List item: Visit 100 of the Lonely Planet’s Ultimate Travelist
Progress: 67/100Sight: Sagrada Familia
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Position: #16

How do I start talking about the Sagrada Familia? I mean this is something that is the definition of breathtaking and the damned thing isn’t even finished yet. 9-10 years until completion and its construction has taken the work of generations of architects, planners and builders.

The outside of the church is amazing enough. It’s absolutely massive and the tallest towers are nowhere near completion yet. Hell, only two of the three facades are nearly done – the other just looked it had barely been started.

The sheer level of detail on the facades themselves are incredible. At the moment we can see those dedicated to the nativity and the crucifixion (the third and final facade is still under construction as of writing this). They completely contrast with the other – the nativity side being more exuberant with its carvings of animals and beautifully designed leaf doors.

It’s things like the incredibly ornate doors and the cryptogram on the side of the passion facade that show just huge this project is. With most of the original designs lost due in a fire started by rioting citizens the design and building of the Sagrada Familia really has become a group effort. Oh and this is all just the outside.

That first time I stepped into the basilica itself was literally breathtaking. I just stood there covered in goosebumps and had to take a minute to register as much as I could. If I believed in that sort of thing I guess it would be called a ‘religious experience’, but for me I’ll just say that I was incredibly overwhelmed by the beauty.

Because of the vastness of the interior it is impossible to find one picture that truly showcases what it looks like. It doesn’t help that, thanks to Gaudí’s amazing use of light, the colour inside the basilica changes throughout the day.

Why? Because of the stained glass windows. The colours and positioning of the windows have been done for maximum effect – cooler colours on one side and warmer shades on the other. When we were inside there was a lot of light coming from the warmer windows which gave the space above the alter a soft golden glow.

To be honest, I did not want to leave. I wanted to just stay inside and keep exploring the nuances in Gaudí’s design. Like how the columns were all slightly different in colour and ridging. The jewelled names of the Evangelists. The long list of names that can be found within the windows themselves. Just wow. I now know what a real life version of the stone forest of Nausicaa looks like – and I know I have to come back when it is complete.

Alas, we still had many things to see so it was goodbye and onto the second place of worship some 9 stops away on the Barcelona Metro – which I want to pay a massive compliment to. We bought a 10 trip ticket and that’s really going to see us through the whole trip.

 List item: Visit 100 of the Lonely Planet’s Ultimate Travelist
Progress: 68/100Sight: Camp Nou
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Position: #470

So yes, when I said worship I don’t think I was too out of order to put football under that umbrella. Under the insistence of the guide we went to visit Camp Nou. I drew the line at the the 25€ to do the tour since I have no interest in football. I know it’s a bit of a cop out, but that’s expensive for something you don’t really want to do.

Still, that’s another Lonely Planet site ticked off… just not one that I found too interesting.

So, hitched another ride on the Metro and got off at the southern end of La Rambla – but first we took a turn around the marina, because why not. I keep forgetting that this is a seaside city. I had colleagues telling me to go to the beach, which I didn’t do because I have no real interest in beaches. I do love the water though, even if this was a wee bit cluttered by all the port buildings.

We eventually made it up La Rambla and into what would best be described as my place of worship: the food market. In this instance La Boqueria. It’s not as big as Borough Market or Tsukiji Fish Market, but it was so interesting to look around the place!

Sadly I fell short of my aim to find a place that sold fried bull testicles (or criadillas), so I guess I’ll have to wait for another trip to Spain before crossing that food item off the list. Still, I managed to purchase some list chorizo and cheese that I need to somehow get back to London in one piece. The list of food items that I am bringing back to the UK just keeps on growing.

After a short rest in the hotel room we were back on the road, well the metro, funicular and cable car, but you know what I mean. Our final destination was Montjuïc Castle so we could get some good views over the city.

The first thing that struck me was a weird smell that was very much like the smell of cooking Heinz Spaghetti Hoops. I guess there was a restaurant nearby and the wind was in the right direction? Or maybe a tomato field was on fire? I have no idea, but what I DO know is how gratifying it is to still qualify as a reduced fee for some of these Barcelona attractions.

This is possibly the best view you can get of the city of Barcelona. The seagulls appear to really appreciate it as they circle above the sea-facing parts of the castle. Be careful of their divebombing – the hub had a misadventure with one of them crapping very near him and just clipping his forearm. Gross.

We walked down the mountain, taking in the views of Barcelona on the way down and coming across the famous site where the Olympic diving competitions took place 25 years ago. I completely get how those fantastic pictures were taken now of those divers with the city skyline in the background.

Dinner was another tapas affair – this time at Cerveceria Catalana. I mention this restaurant by name because the food here was beautiful. We ordered 7 different dishes and the bill still came out to under 40€. Some highlights were the fried artichokes, the Spanish omelette and goats cheese with escalivada (that last one was the hub’s pick, and the boy did well there).

So yea, I really think we should have been here for longer. I mean, Barcelona is one of THE cities in Europe and we only had two full day to explore it. Still, we sure made the most of it. For our final day in Spain we are venturing to the nearby town of Figueres to take in the Dalí museum. Bit nervous about this considering the Picasso Museu yesterday… but I guess I’ll just have to wait and see.

The Great EU Quest: Spain – Gaudí and Barcelona

So here we are with the first of two full days in Barcelona, or should I say Gaudíville considering how much of his handiwork I will end up seeing and just how in love this city appears to be with its native son.

The first stop of the day was the Casa Battló (although I really do prefer the nickname ‘house of bones’ considering the balconies look like jawbones and vertebrae. I’ve been inside a lot of residences when in vacation, but I don’t think that I have seen or will ever see anything like this ever again. It is extraordinary, with plenty of kudos going to go the people who now run this as the augmented reality audio tour helped bring this sublime house to life.

It’s hard to adequately describe this building. Many people have tried, but I guess the best way would be that this house feels alive. The flying turtles of the guide might have helped with that… but so much of this house was utterly astonishing. Not only is this house a masterpiece on an artistic level, but it was made to be incredibly liveable with innovative and practical solutions for light and temperature regulation.

The chimneys and flourishes on the roof were another thing altogether, but I think I have spent long enough on Casa Battló – after all this isn’t the only Gaudí build that we saw today.

So off we went on our first trip on the Barcelona Metro to visit Park Güell… where we had no idea of the steep walk that was awaiting us. Whilst I would have made it up the hill without the use of escalators, I was very appreciative of their existence.

I was also appreciative of some of the views of Barcelona that we managed to get from the top of this mountain. I know that I saw the Sagrada Familia from the airplane as it started in its descent, but it still shocks me just how much this basilica in construction dominates the Barcelona landscape. I just cannot wait until we pay it a visit tomorrow.

Park Güell is one of those things I might not have gone straight for if it wasn’t for Yuri!!! On Ice. Sad but true. There was a pretty sweet scene in the show with Yurio and the Kazakh skater, which made me want to check out the Monument Park section. It wasn’t exactly the most representative of the crowds that gather there, but hoards of tourists would have spoilt the mood.

Speaking of hoards, it really was a good thing I booked the tickets to the Monument Zone in advance. By the time we got there the only tickets left were for the final window some 5-6 hours later. After the problems we had getting into the Anne Frank Huis I think I have well and truly learned my lesson about pre-booking certain attractions.

Some of the stuff that Gaudí planned and executed for this park are worthy of many a roll of film. A lot of photos were taken of the iconic staircases and the open theatre sections. I, however, heavily fell for some of the rockwork in the free section of the park. It’s extraordinary to see how he was able to use the contours of the mountain to then advantage of his work. It just feels like the mountain has chosen to sprout this terrace with its walkways, vaulted ceilings and twisted columns. Just amazing.

Sadly it was time to say goodbye to Gaudí, at least for the moment, and go for lunch. Nothing major, just some really nice sandwiches from a cafe en route to the metro station. The botifarra blanca sandwich was my favourite of the two – sadly it isn’t the botifarra dolca from the food list, but I know of a butcher that sells this and is next open on our final day in Spain… so watch this space I guess.

List item: Visit 100 of the Lonely Planet’s Ultimate Travelist
Progress: 66/100Sight: Museu Picasso
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Position: #371

Our last main site of the day was the Museu Picasso. Finally, a Lonely Planet thing to be ticked off! Now, considering this is on the list and Casa Battló is not, I was very disappointed.

I think the problem is that in order to have a museum dedicated to a particular artist you really need to have some of the major masterpieces. Especially if you are going to rate it among the top 500 world sites to be visited. I mean, sure the Van Gogh museum didn’t have all of them, but there were so many in that museum to make it an extremely worthwhile visit.

However, there is nothing here that I recognised. Also, which was rather telling, this museum appeared to be missing works from 10-20 years of Picasso’s life. This was the time where he painted things like Guernica, The Weeping Woman or (my favourite) Three Musicians. It was interesting to see just how talented he was as a painter from an incredibly young age… but much like some of the works on display, this museum feels a bit unfinished.

We did a bit of wandering until ultimately heading back to the hotel. Seeing how it was both Sunday and Father’s Day a lot of things were closed. Not the Ham Museum though. As tempting as it was our feet were aching and some pre-dinner chilling was needed.

List Item: Try three quarters of the 1001 Foods You Must Try Before You Die

Food item: Cadi Butter

Hooray! I can tick off a food list item. It was one of those I was really hoping to find as well. You cannot get this in the UK and this now leaves me with just one butter to find. Sadly it’s Russian butter and whilst I would love to try that… I know I won’t be exactly welcome.

Cadi butter is pale and highly spreadable. Compared to other butters I have tried the flavour fairly muted. It’s nowhere near as creamy and doesn’t have as intense a flavour profile as I am used to. It’s really nice on a Tuc biscuit as the butter is unsalted and the salt on the Tuc gives it that extra punch. So yes, this needs salt.

Dinner ended up being just off La Rambla (a proper shifty will be done tomorrow) because literally no restaurant on that street scores higher than 2.5-3/5 on Trip Advisor. I mean I know tourist traps are a thing, but this is ridiculous.

Still, we were directed to a restaurant where we had our first authentic paella.

Food item: Fasolia Gigandes

Two in one day. Phew. You can’t see the beans from the picture. But they were most certainly there buried among some of the best tasting paella I’ve ever had. Apparently this restaurant is known for having good paella, so who am I to disagree. According to the menu this was a Valencian paella, which means I probably just ate my first rabbit meat.

So yes, some hazelnut gelato later and I am sat in the hotel typing up the day. I am really looking forward to what I will be seeing tomorrow morning. Hopefully I’ll be able to get some half decent pictures!

Progress: 631/751

The Great EU Quest: Spain – Arrival

There are times where it feels like you are not meant to reach your destination – this trip to Barcelona is just such an example.

Let’s just start off with a quick number crunch on the EU list:

List Item: Visit all EU countries
Progress: 15/28

I know that I am going to get to a point where I am still trying to complete the EU list after the UK has made its awkward departure, but for now I think I will just end up saying any country that has ever been part of the EU. That’ll cover me should another country make a similar decision or, for whatever reason, the EU ceases to exist.

Country: Spain
Year first visited: 2017

Anyway, back to more pleasant topics – the fact that we almost missed the plane thanks to train troubles. Oh yes, in order to get to Stansted Airport from South East London you only have two main options: train/tube or car. When you don’t drive that means a £50-60 trip in an Uber, so public transport it is.

Now imagine you get to the only station in London that goes to Stansted (aka Liverpool Street, try the cheese shop if you have time), here has been an issue with the line (that Google Maps is unaware of) and you have to make a 2-3 hour detour via Cambridge. Needless to say we just ran and ran once we got to the airport and just about made it. Not exactly the best way to start a holiday, but at least we managed to get to Barcelona!

I know it has only been 4-5 hours since landing, but I have already begun to fall for this city in a major way. It was amazing to see some of the snow capped mountains on the way in, as well as the towering presence of the Sagrada Familia during the plane’s descent.

As of the moment we haven’t explored too far, but we have had a good nose around the area near the hotel (where we managed to get a free room upgrade – which came with a balcony view and a free bottle of cava).

One of the places that we came across was Catalunya Square. We re-visited this square later in the evening because of the promise of dancing water fountains. We weren’t disappointed. They were very cute.

Of course the big question of the evening ended up being: “what will we have for dinner”. I think that during this visit to Barcelona there are two main dinners we want to have – paella and tapas/pintxos.

From the pictures you can see that we ended up going for tapas. A lot of them were things I have had before back in Britain, but being in the home of tapas everything did taste better. Especially the anchovies. They were ruddy gorgeous.

Being spring I also managed to get some calçots (which were deep-fried) and romesco sauce. I do love these giant spring onions very much and would highly recommend them once spring rolls around again.

A bit of a walk later and it was back to the hotel so hub could drain the cava as I write up the day. I have a feeling that I won’t be ticking off many food items during this holiday, but hey ho there’s so much to see anyway so any additional foods will be a bonus.

Oh Vienna – Day 3: Schönbrunn

My last full day in Vienna? That just feels incredibly wrong. This is the problem of having these short weekend breaks, as lovely as they are it is just over too soon.

img_4502
Still, we made the most out of today and the way to do that is with a good breakfast (well, brunch by the time we started). In many ways Vienna has similar prices to London, but if you are smart about it you will not break the bank. See this breakfast for two that I shared with the hub. It really kept us going through most of the day, where we were on our feet pretty much all the time.

img_4506
The destination today was Schönbrunn, which is a very short metro ride out of the city centre. The main draw is the UNESCO Heritage recognised palace and gardens.

The palace was the former summer residence for the Habsburg emperors of Austria-Hungary and is absolutely massive. I swear that we don’t have palaces to this scale in the UK, when you consider that this former hunting lodge expanded into well over 1000 rooms.

img_4511
I would be so interested to see what the grounds are like in summer with full flower beds and running fountains. In December it is still beautifully grand (and smells of cinnamon thanks to the resident Christmas market), but a little bit bleak.

There were signs that said you would need to wait 2.5 hours before being able to enter the palace to have a look around. What these signs did not tell you is that you could head in straight away if you bought one of the combined tickets to another nearby attraction. We know this purely because it was our plan to do this anyway.

The interior of the palace that we saw as part of the “Imperial Tour” was extremely grand. Sadly there were signs everywhere that said no photography was allowed inside, but I think we all disobeyed that rule when it came to the this grand ballroom.

img_4505

I haven’t never been to Versailles, but if the hall of mirrors there is meant to be greater than this ballroom… well I think I know where my next planned trip might end up being. Seriously though, going to this palace, the Imperial Crypt and seeing how much they still revere Maria Theresa makes me want to learn more about the history of the Habsburgs. If you have any suggestions of where I can start, please let me know.

After an hour long tour of the palace we walked through the gardens on the way to Schönbrunn Tiergarten (ie the zoo). This was originally started as an imperial menagerie  and has since expended into one of the best zoos I have ever been to.

img_4552 img_4528

This is not just because of the variety of animals (which includes polar bears, sea lions, leopards and pandas), but also the condition of the enclosures. This is a zoo that has successfully bred polar bears and pandas so you know they are doing something right.

I has running about this zoo like a little kid (who was cold seeing how we didn’t get too far about freezing today) looking at all the animals that I could see in the few hours we had in this amazing zoo.

img_4545

Of course we ended up spending a lot of time with the pandas. How couldn’t I? They’re pandas! We were there a solid 10 minutes hoping it would turn around and only when we went to leave did she suddenly move and allow me to take such cool pictures. This was better than seeing the pandas at Ueno in Tokyo. Can’t believe I was actually so close.

img_4562

We stayed into the zoo until it closed. The closing announcement came through whilst we were in the aquarium staring at a rather lively octopus. So it was back to the city centre before we got locked in with the crocodiles.

img_4573

Rather than heading straight for food (we were all hungry by now) we visited the, now dark, Stadtpark to see some of the statues. The main ones were still lit up anyway so the emptiness of the park just added to the ambience. The statue that I came to see was this golden one of Strauss. It’s nice to see someone other than Mozart being revered in this city.

List Item: Try three quarters of the 1001 Foods You Must Try Before You Die
img_4579Food item: Linzer Torte

By now we needed a sit down so it was an early evening cake and drinks before a final runthrough of the Christmas markets. Finally I was able to try some Linzer torte. I got it as a slice because could not find it as the typical torte. Better than Sacher torte by a mile. The toasted hazlenuts and the crumbly cake are brought together by the seam of redcurrant jam. Where the Sacher torte was a disappointment this Linzer torte is a pleasant surprise.

img_4582Food item: Horseradish
Progress: 593/751

One of the big things that my mum wanted to have from the market stalls was some Tiroler gröstl. We had it when we were in Kitzbühl back in 1999 and there were stalls selling it here. To my surprise they put grated horseradish on top. There is nothing I like more than a surprise list item and this horseradish really complimented the fried bacon and potatoes. Makes me feel like I am 9 again.

img_4584

The final Christmas market we went back to was the one on the Rathausplatz, which is both the biggest one and the nearest to our hotel. There were some last minute purchases and a complete final runthrough. I can’t believe we are going from somewhere this filled with Christmas and going back to a flat where the decorations aren’t even up yet!

img_4587

Of course I finished the evening with a hot dog. I have not had anywhere near enough wurst since I have been in Austria and at least I was able to finish this trip the right way.

That’s it for Vienna. There is a separate food post coming up where I will finish off this run of posts, but for now here are some things I will miss about Vienna:

1) Classically trained buskers – we have seen a violinist, a cellist and a tuba player playing film themes on the street. In London you are more likely to see a man playing a traffic cone.

2) Seeing Mozart’s face everywhere i go. We don’t do the same in London and now I want to know why we don’t plaster all our tourist shops with the face of Dickens or Shakespeare. Such a missed opportunity.

3) Architecture. It’s overblown and utterly amazing. The commute to work will feel all the more boring after visiting Vienna

img_4581

4) Christmas markets – come on London we can do something on this scale and with this high level of quality. Sod off with your Hyde Park Winter Wonderlands and give us something decent!