Tag Archives: tallinn

The Great EU Quest: Estonia – Happy Museum Day

Last full day in Estonia – just how I got to this position so quickly is beyond me, but that’s always the way when you are on holiday.

I think the best way to off this post would to wish you all a belated Happy International Museum Day. Yes, that is a thing and this year it was on May 18th. In Tallinn this meant that every museum we came across waived the entrance fee for a day. Just to be upfront about this, all the savings that we made today (which amounted to over 40€) happened by sheer fluke. I had no idea about any of this and really cannot believe my luck about any of this.

The day started out with us making the 3km walk from our hotel near the Old Town to Kadriorg Park. Our first destination of the day was the park’s namesake (Kadriorg Palace) but that doesn’t mean that we didn’t take out chance to look around before getting to the first museum of the day.

So this was the point where we learned about this day being International Museum Day and that museums across Tallinn were doing free entry for the day. We still had to visit the ticket office to get a sticker and check our bags, but apart from that we could pretty much stroll in.

As someone who has been feeling in a bit of a Russian history mood after finishing Anna Karenina I looked forward to the chance to stroll around this palace. It was built by Tsar Peter the Great for his wife Catherine (which explains the name) as a small Baroque style palace that would be used as a summer retreat.

As a building this has changed hands a few times (as has country of Estonia) and is now part of the The Art Museum of Estonia where it houses their foreign art collection. The fact that this was an art museum was of lesser concern to us since we were mainly there to have a nose around an imperial summer palace.


If you are to come to this palace there is one room in particular that will grab you and is referred to as the Baltic Pearl of the North. It functioned as a stateroom and, according to the information plaque, is the only room of this type in a Northern Europe to have been preserved as it was back then.

It’s a beautiful room. If it wasn’t for Helsinki’s Rock Church this would be the most impressive single room that I’d seen. Just the ornateness and the extreme whiteness of  the fixtures keep you looking around and finding new things to focus on. For me, it was interesting to note that this was actually quite a small room for its function when you consider the larger residential palaces of royal families. I guess that’s down to this being a ‘summer home’.

Seeing how it was an Estonian May, the garden wasn’t exactly ready for tourist season. It’s a shame as I can imagine it being rather beautiful once everything is in bloom. Hey ho, at least these flowerbeds see the light of day, unlike the statues that this palace has in a storage room next to the toilets. That was weird.


Continuing the theme of Peter the Great: the next stop was a few buildings down the road. It’s the cottage of Peter the Great which he stayed in as the palace was being completed. The idea that a Tsar would stay I’m a small building like this rather than just retiring to one of his other palaces is a bit of an odd thought. I guess it just speaks for the pull of Tallinn.

The museum itself is rather small since the cottage itself was rather small. It made for a more intimate insight into how one of the richest men in the world lived back then. Seeing all these things has really made me realise that I really should try to learn more about European history. After all, knowing about the past can help you know the future.

Before I get too philosophical lets move onto the next museum: the Kumu Museum. Essentially this is the main art museum in Tallinn with a collection split across 3 floors. The main focus of the art in this museum is Art by Estonian artists, but there are pieces by others in here too… even if I hadn’t heard of any of these.


If you start from the top and work down you are pretty much going back in time; something that I would really recommend. The more modern section was focused on art by women and was curated around an Estonian artist of recent years Anu Põder. The work varied from bizarre images of blow-up dolls with parts of their bodies being crushed to a rather sad installation centred around a Polish artist and her cancer diagnosis.


The art of the remaining two floors really helped to fill in a number of gaps surrounding Estonian history and the psyche of the people. For the first thing I didn’t realise just how important music is to this country, I know that they hold a song festival and that this is a major event in the Estonian calendar, but having this out into the context of the rise of Estonian national identity in the early 1900s really helped to cement the importance. I know that Finland went through similar with Sibelius’s work ‘Finlandia’ being an example this.

Also, it was interesting to see a lot of the art that was being created during the Soviet occupation. I mean, it hasn’t even occurred to me that there would be hippies in the Soviet Union during the 1960s, I figured that the cultural wall was so airtight that things like the counter-culture of the USA would have struggled to make it through.

Another thing that this forced me to appreciate is just how hard the job of curating a gallery of Estonian art must be. As a language and as a culture the Estonian people have been around for ages, but as a nation it has only been 100 years. To try and work out if an artist is Estonian or an occupying population (German, Swedish, Russian etc) must be onerous at times. So, full credit where it is due there.


3 km and a sea buckthorn juice later from one of the many shopping centres in Tallinn, we were back in the Old Town for the final museum of the day at St Nicholas Church. This is another example of a building in Tallinn that has been repurposed into an art museum, but at least the work in the church stays on message.

Whilst the interior of the church itself is very beautiful, the thing that has stayed with me  the most as I write at gone midnight (I really need to start these earlier, I blame the latest Trump scandal on CNN) was the depiction of the Danse Macabre. Essentially, this is a long painting depicting members high up in the social hierarchy (e.g. The Pope, an emperor and a king) being led by dancing skeletons. Essentially this a symbol of the plague and about how no one can escape death, no matter their status. I had to take my time to appreciate this one because it was so large and quite unusual. Regrettably the sister piece to this artwork was housed in a church in Lübeck, Germany that was bombed in World War Two.


The rest of the church/museum exhibited pieces from the church and, in what I believe is a temporary exhibition, silver work from one of the old guilds in Tallinn (or Reval as it was known back then).


After some final pieces of souvenir shopping it was time for an early dinner where we returned to Olde Hansa. It made for a nice way to bookmark the trip and allowed us to see inside this surprisingly good touristy medieval themed restaurant.


As a main course I went for the game sausages which is meant to be made from a mixture of wild boar, elk and (you guessed it) bear. I have no idea how much, if any, bear meat there was in these sausages, but they were absolutely gorgeous. As was the sauerkraut and turnips that it was served with. I know that my mum recoiled at the idea of eating bear meat, but I feel that if you are in a country with properly regulated hunting (as is the case with Estonia) then give it a go; else, maybe not.


For dessert it was a rose pudding with edible rose petals that was out of this world. Usually the tourist themed restaurants have something that lets them down such as the quality of food or service, but Olde Hansa really did knock it out of the park both times.

So yes, after a final walk around the Old Town it was packing in the hotel room and getting ready for the…oh wait there’s something else.

List Item: Try three quarters of the 1001 Foods You Must Try Before You Die
Food item: Boysenberry
Progress: 650/751

We bought a jar of boysenberry jam when we were in Helsinki and it only occurred to me as we were packing that I wouldn’t be able to bring this back because of the rules around liquids in carry on bags. I guess this is a downside of not paying to check in a bag. But hey midnight jam is midnight jam and I’ve reached another food list landmark!

Botanically boysenberry is a hybrid of a number of berries including European raspberry and blackberry. You get that from the taste. Usually I am not that much of a jam fan as I find the traditional strawberry and raspberry jams too sweet and blackcurrant jams as a bit too tart. This Finnish boysenberry jam is right on that sweet-spot between sweet and tart, therefore it is gorgeous and there is no way that I will be able to buy this in the UK.

So I’m needing to wind this down because it’s a travel day tomorrow. I’ve really enjoyed my time here in Estonia (and the day trip to Finland). It makes me sad that it is over and it is back to the daily grind. Seeing as how I have now seen Estonia and Lithuania one of the next countries on my list needs to be Latvia so I can complete the set. Maybe the same time next year as I have enjoyed being in Tallinn just before the tourist season hits.

So until then, goodbye Baltics. I’ll miss you.

The Great EU Quest: Estonia – The Old Town

Oh man after minimal sleep there was a well deserved lie in today. Aside from a rather weird pillow that kept re-inflating itself as you got comfortable this bed at the Palace Hotell in Tallinn is one of the most comfortable I’ve ever slept in.

 List item: Visit 100 of the Lonely Planet’s Ultimate Travelist
Progress: 70/100Sight: Tallinn Old Town
Location: Tallinn, Estonia
Position: #112

So today is the day that we properly covered the Old Town. There are still places like St Nicolas Church, the KGB museum and Kiek in de Kök to check out but that’s what the final full day is for.

One thing that continues to completely astound me about the Tallinn Old Town is just how well preserved it is. A huge proportion of the city wall is still intact in some shape or form and there are gates and towers that still survive to this day. Similarly, it would appear that the Tallinn Town Hall is 600-700 years old and is the oldest hall of its type in Northern Europe. Just, wow.


As a nice link with my trip to Vilnius, we first sought out the plaque symbolising the northernmost point of the ‘Baltic Way’ – a protest in 1989 where over 1 million citizens of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania formed a human chain through their capitals. As of now I have now stood at both ends of the chain. I guess I’ll need to find out if there is a similar commemoration in Riga when I end up visiting.

After this we were originally headed for the walkable section of the city walls… but being the eager beavers that we are we got there s bit before they opened. So we instead headed for Toompea (a small hill within the old town that overlooks everything). It is here that you can find the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral and Toompea Castle.


I say Toompea Castle, but this is not a castle as we had expected. Instead, what we have today is the very pink Estonian parliamentary building that has been build into some of the surviving castle walls and towers. The tallest tower has the beautiful Estonian flag hanging from the top. Yes, I am still enamoured with this flag and I have already bought a number of souvenirs containing the flag.

So from here we mooched around Toompea for a while. Getting lost in the winding streets and pastel buildings whilst entering way too many souvenir shops. Some embassies are up on Toompea including those of Ireland, Canada and the Netherlands. honestly, I cannot fault any nation that managed to snag a spot on Toompea, this is where you can get some beautiful views.


Such as this one. From up here you can really appreciate just how close the sea is, which goes a long way towards explaining all the cruise ship holidaymakers you see roaming the streets of Tallinn in large groups.

By the time we were done with Toompea a drink was in order for whatever reason we decided to go to the cafe built into the walls around the Danish King’s Garden. Oh my god the steepness and winding of the the stairs. It’s shameful to admit just how much my knees ached after climbing up these and I very much deserved a slice of apple pie.

We eventually made our way back to the walkable walls and took a walk along them. It isn’t a long walk despite the length of walls that are still around, but I guess not enough of them are connected or stable enough to allow a longer walkway. The people of York really should count themselves lucky there.


From this vantage point of the walls it is clear that the Estonians are very proud of their city and all the buildings within it. Honestly I can’t blame them. I have yet to go too far into their more recent history, but if it’s anything like what the people of Lithuania went through then they deserve every inch of national pride.

We dipped into a beautifully decorated Russian Orthodox church (that sadly didn’t allow any pictures, but trust me it was beautiful with its starry ceiling and gilded iconography) before venturing outside the city walls. You see, tomorrow we booked a trip on a ferry across the Gulf of Finland to visit Helsinki – so we did a hint of reconnaissance to try and find the port.


I knew that Tallinn is close to the sea, but I had never realised just how close. It’s not a beach city like many others, but there’s something about being close to the sea that just adds to a city.

List Item: Try three quarters of the 1001 Foods You Must Try Before You Die
Food item: Zander
Progress: 647/751

Dinner time! With the sun setting around 10pm it does feel weird to be having dinner in complete daylight.

Thanks to a happy coincidence after walking through St Catherine’s Passage I managed to find a restaurant that served zander! For the uninitiated this is a fish that is related to perch and is also known by the name pike-perch.

Honestly, I was expecting something a bit plainer for some reason. They way that the good people of Munga Kelda prepared this (pan fried with salt, pepper and dill before adding a bit of cheese on top) was absolutely gorgeous.

I guess I would say that The taste of the fish is the fish version of gamy. You can also tell from the taste how this is a predator fish like pike and black scabbardfish. Still, it’s a white fleshed fish with larger flakes than the scabbardfish.

So yes, that the first full day done. Early start tomorrow to catch an 8am ferry over to Helsinki. I’m really excited about visiting Finland… hopefully I don’t spend too much on weird souvenirs and squeaky cheese.

The Great EU Quest: Estonia – Arrival

That’s right. It is two months after my trip to Barcelona and I am on my travels yet again. Another completely new country for me which means…

List Item: Visit all EU countries
Progress: 16/28

Now this is one of those countries that I would have expected to have visited before Lithuania. I have always had a soft spot for Estonia for a particularly stupid reason – their flag. It’s weird I know, but I have always found Estonia to have the best looking national flag in Europe, which means that I will likely end up spending too much on souvenirs that make use of it.

Country: Estonia
Year first visited: 2017

Unlike a lot of other holidays this day of arrival was a true first day since the only flight between London and Tallinn required us to be at the airport by 5am. Honestly, I am shocked that I am at the end of the day and have yet to really feel the need to fall asleep.

Aside from crossing off another EU nation there is another reason for this visit Estonia: Tallinn’s Old Town. Therefore we went for a hotel that would allow us to make the best of it and I am able to take a picture like this:

So after a bit of light complaining about how tired and hungry we were it was time to venture forth into the Old Town itself. Since we are doing a proper explore of the Old Town tomorrow I won’t be crossing this off until then, still we were able to get a good feel for it.

The first thing that really grabbed me was just how well preserved so many of these old buildings are. You read, on conveniently located plaques, about how certain places date from several centuries ago and yet they look in better condition than most UK buildings from the 1960s.

Lunch was in a place called Olde Hansa – a restaurant I’ve seen mentioned in a bunch of guides about Tallinn. Why? Because the servers dress up in medieval garb and the foot is meant to somewhat resemble food of the time. This is a place that even serves bear meat! Tempting, but not 50€ tempting.

The food was hearty and reminded me a lot of food that I had in Bled a few years ago. I am under no illusion that most medieval serfs could have only dreamed of a plate like this, but it was fun to pretend.

After this it was a general explore of the area. We came across a large market selling flowers, giant tombstones, a huge variety of local handicrafts and many prospective places for future coffees and food. Like I said, there will be more of a proper explore tomorrow, but it was such a beautiful day that it would be a shame to let sleep deprivation get in the way.

One big thing we did see/do was the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral. Its of the buildings that I can see from the hotel room and the onion domes are a really imposing presence at the top of the Toompea Hill. Whilst this is not the largest Russian Orthodox church I have seen, it is the one that has made the biggest impact.

Inside, this is far from the bare or nearly bare Orthodox churches that I saw in Vilnius. Aside from the abundance of iconography and the enforced near silence, this church really had more of a Catholic feel to it.

Fast forwarding quite a bit now to dinner. Since we wanted to catch up on sleep we grabbed some bread, cheese and ham from a nearby supermarket to have for dinner. Luckily for me I was able to find a list cheese.

List Item: Try three quarters of the 1001 Foods You Must Try Before You DieFood item: Leipajuusto
Progress: 646/751

In Finnish the name basically means ‘bread cheese’, but in English speaking countries it’s called ‘Finnish squeaky cheese’. In Estonia, it would appear that they call it ‘Lapland Cheese’. Anyway, no matter what you call it this was an interesting cheese.

My god it doesn’t half squeak with every bite that you take. I knew that it would squeak, but not on every bite. It should be weird, but I think this might have been the most fun I have had with food since shabu shabu.

Tastewise it’s a bit like a creamy cottage cheese or a springy hard mozzarella. It has the texture of halloumi, but is unsalted so I can see how you might want to use it as a substitute for the Greek salad cheeses.

On its own the taste is milk, but it is lifted by the presence of other flavours like bacon and onion – I know this because some of the cheese had bacon pieces in it. Much like the smokey blue cheese, I am already sad that I won’t be able to get this in the UK as this would be perfect to have every now and then.

So there you go, the end of day one and as I finish writing this I can feel the lack of sleep catching up to me. Tomorrow will be a full day exploring the old town – who knows what we’ll find.