Tag Archives: Diana Ross

1001 Songs – 1970: Part One

Holy hell, a new decade. It feels like it’s been an awful long time since I first entered the 1960s. How long will it be until I start on songs from the 1980s? Who knows, but I hope to start syncing up the songs and albums lists by the time I get there.

Up Around The Bend – Creedence Clearwater Revival

When I think of Creedence Clearwater Revival my mind goes to a line from “Him” by Lily Allen where she postulates that they’re God’s favourite band. From this I took it that the music would be rather tame. Compared to what I am expecting in two songs time, yes, this is going to seem a bit middle of the road.

I don’t know if it is me just looking back on how this contrasts with The Rolling Stones and The Who, but this feels a bit softer and more wholesome. I know I only listened to the eponymous album by The Band yesterday, but Creedence Clearwater Revival is in the same genre camp. It’s just that… compared to what follows it’s a bit blah.

Layla – Derek & The Dominos

I remember waiting through most of Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs; that entire album just rests in the shadow of this seven minute behemoth of a song. A song that only appears at the end of an extremely long beginning sequence.

At the time of listening to that album I think I was so annoyed about the amount of time it took to get to ‘Layla’ that I wasn’t able to appreciate it. I also hadn’t expected the second half to be this long instrumental piece. Needless to say that I probably didn’t give that song a good enough go the first time around.

‘Layla’ is a song about unrequited heartbreak using a Persian fairytale as a touchstone for names and certain themes. That alone speaks to some of the grandiosity of the song. Add to that the fierce guitar riff, vocals that break with emotion and a long outro to give something truly special. We’ll gloss over the fact that their relationship did happen and ended in divorce…

War Pigs – Black Sabbath

Ladies and gentlemen, may I present to you the arrival of metal. We previously had Led Zeppelin’s ‘Whole Lotta Love’ almost reaching the point of metal (close, but I think that’s still hard rock rather than metal), but ‘War Pigs’ is probably the first song from this line that crosses the line. It is still very hard rock in places, which means the development into a completely separate genre hasn’t happened yet… but we’re basically there now.

This is also the first song on this list that has anyone singing about a subject that is vaguely Satanic. The real name of this song, ‘Warpurgis’, is in reference to Walpurgis Night – which is pretty much Halloween in Spring. This is a harder anti-establishment message than the ‘Flower Power’ of the 1960s and I’m starting to see how punk will be starting to brew in the background.

When the Revolution Comes – The Last Poets

I thought I needed some time away from rock. I thought I needed a bit of a palate cleanser. What I got was a good laugh and I had to restart this song because I couldn’t hear it over my own snorting. This was not the song that I expected.

‘When the Revolution Comes’ is under the genre of jazz poetry, which is one of the precursors to rap. From the sentiment and the forcefulness of the lyrics you can see where the likes of Public Enemy will have spun off from. At this very moment, however, this is a poetry slam set to some very basic music.

What made me laugh so much? The backing vocalists. Everytime they chimed in I just lost it. As a piece it would have worked better as a solo.

Band of Gold – Freda Payne

It feels like a long time since I last listened to a good piece of female driven music on this 1001 songs list. I believe the last one was Peggy Lee’s ‘Is That All There Is?’, but that’s not uplifting at all. Well, this song isn’t truly uplifting because it’s talking about a marriage breaking down… but it feels upbeat.

As a song ‘Band of Gold’ feels like a nice reaching back to the golden days of the Motown songstresses. After all the rock and… whatever that jazz poetry was, ‘Band of Gold’ feels comfortable and more in-keeping with what I’d enjoy hearing.

Love the One You’re With – Stephen Stills

At last, we have a feel good song! A guitar driven upbeat folk song about loving. After songs of heartbreak, revolution and the devil it’s a nice change to have something so positive. Positive without being too cloying.

Not much else to say. The lush backing vocals was a nice surprise. Made me think of the closing song from A Mighty Wind.

Fire and Rain – James Taylor

Hands up if you’ve only heard of James Taylor because of his guest spot on the episode of The Simpsons where Homer goes to space. I thought I recognised the voice and then he got to the line about ‘sweet dreams and flying machines’ which clinched it for me.

As a folk rock song ‘Fire and Rain’ is the ultimate comedown from ‘Love the One You’re With’. It’s a song that deals with death, depression, drug addiction and failure. So far in 1970 there have been songs about heartbreak, but this is the first song that breaks your heart.

I just love that Carole King partially wrote ‘You’ve Got A Friend’ as a response to this. I love that woman.

Ain’t No Mountain High Enough – Diana Ross

Let’s end on an empowering high, shall we? At this point Diana Ross needed to prove that a woman could strike out on her own after being part of a successful girl group – ‘Ain’t No Mountain High Enough’ formed part of the solo debut that catapulted her to iconic status.

The song mixes elements of soul, gospel and spoken word to create Diana Ross’ first solo hit. When you think of the song you are likely to only bring to mind that massive final minute. I had no idea that there was this huge build up to the gospel explosion that accompanies Bridget Jones running through the snow.

This won’t be the last we hear from Diana Ross, but it will be another six years.

Progress: 301/1021

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