🎻♫♪ – The Sorcerer’s Apprentice by Paul Dukas

List Item: Listen to half of the 1001 Classical Works You Must Hear Before You Die
Progress:
 53/501Title: The Sorcerer’s Apprentice
Composer: Paul Dukas
Nationality: French
Year:
1897

Right, so it appears that pre-Fantasia I have not done a separate listen for all the pieces from that film that happen to also be on the 1001 classical list. The opening piece from the film, whilst on this list, is part of a larger collection of Beethoven’s Preludes, Fantasias, Toccatas & Fugues – so will be doing that at a later date.

So, how can I talk about Dukas’ The Sorcerer’s Apprentice separate from its appearance in Fantasia. Whether or not you like Disney’s visual interpretation of the ancient story (although this symphonic poem is based on Goethe’s 1797 poem) you can’t fault them for popularizing a great piece of music.

During this classical listening quest, some of my favourite pieces to listen to have been one’s with definite stories (like Lieutenant Kijé and The Isle of the Dead) although, to be fair, most of the non-story ones I’ve listened to so far are motets or motet-adjacent – which have given me some issues other than a lack of story.

The orchestra required to play this is pretty large – mainly as more and more sections need to come in as the apprentice’s spell gets progressively worse. However, an interesting part of this is in the percussion. I think this is the first time in this list that I’ve heard such a prominent use of a glockenspiel… especially such a difficult use. I mean… I find it hard to play Guitar Hero so playing such a part just boggles my mind.

Right, so I think I’m needing to do a non-Fantasia piece very soon. I guess I need to see where I’ll fit that in.

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